LeapPoint Tag

LeapPoint welcomes Tamara Taylor as the Director of Customer Success and Strategic Engagement.  Tamara will drive the strategy and alignment of the customer success program, accelerating our customers’ business value. She will be responsible for the well being of long-term customer relationships and customer experience along key customer journey moments. 

When asked what Tamara is looking forward to most, she responded, “I am thrilled to be part of the LeapPoint leadership team and joining a company that possesses such a talented team of professionals. I’m excited to align my business experience to help clients achieve great organizational success. Working directly with clients is not only my calling; it’s truly an honor.”

As a proven business leader, Tamara has created operational best practices centered around executing key strategic deliverables, high-quality outcomes, and unparalleled customer experiences. She is responsible for building and maintaining a customer-centric focus where success is identified throughout each phase of the customer journey.   

“Our clients are our priority,” said Nicholas DeBenedetto, President and CEO of LeapPoint. “This is another step in the right direction to ensure they are getting the best value of their investment in LeapPoint.” 

Tamara has over two decades of business and technology experience, solving some of the most complex business challenges. She brings to LeapPoint expertise in business strategy, customer success leadership, change management, and portfolio and project management experience.  Tamara has built and led teams in B2B SaaS, healthcare, and higher education environments. She also serves on for-profit and not-for-profit boards, lending her expertise in fundraising and strategic planning.

Prior to LeapPoint, Tamara worked at Workfront, where she served the company’s largest global customers, helping them build their digital transformation strategy to achieve business outcomes. She has worked with customers in various industries, including financial services, government, healthcare, retail, biotech, and higher education. Tamara has made Utah her home. She holds an MBA and an Adjunct Faculty position, both from the University of Utah, located in Salt Lake City.

The “My Tasks Due This Week Report” will impress all of your work license users now that you’ve leveraged advanced Views and Groupings. The benefits of adding advanced Groupings to reports and object lists are:

  • An Admin can group data in ways that aren’t native in the standard user interface
    • Our grouping uses an advanced valueexpression to categorize each task rather than leveraging a task field
  • An Admin can control how the grouping displays to your users
    • Our grouping categorizes each task as either LATE, ON TIME, UPCOMING depending on the day of the week and the task’s planned completion date
  • An Admin can enhance the user experience by creating dynamic advanced groupings
    • Our advanced grouping updates day by day and recategorizes each task using an advanced calculation

 

Before I share the Task and Assignment text mode code, it is important to note that you cannot create a chart using advanced Groupings or Views. Charts must use either native object fields or custom fields.

The text mode code for both Task and Assignment reports is found below:

Task Report Advanced Grouping Text Mode:

 

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textmode=true
group.o.valueexpression=IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})
<DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”LATE”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})=DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”ON
TIME”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))
group.0.valueformat=HTML

 

Assignment Report Advanced Grouping Text Mode:

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group.0.valueexpression=IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.{plannedCompletionDate})
<DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”LATE”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.
{plannedCompletionDate})=DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”ON
TIME”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.
{plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))
group.0.valueformat=HTML
textmode=true

 

I forgot to explain in the “Create Reports Like a Pro! Advanced Views Part III” blog the differences between the Task and Assignment report syntax. If you review the Task object within the API Explorer, you’ll notice that an Assignment is both a referenced and collected object to the Task object. If you create an Assignment report and you need to reference the task object in your text mode, you need to first specify the task object and then the field. For example, in the code above, when I reference the plannedCompletionDate, I preface the field with {task}. This tells Workfront that I am calling the Task object’s planned completion date value. Therefore, whenever you create an object report that references a connecting object, add the object enclosed by curly brackets first, followed by a period, and then the referenced object’s field enclosed by curly brackets.

Next up, you will learn how to build advanced Filters to help find the exact information you are looking for.

In Part I, we discussed what an Advanced Grouping is, what it looks like, and how it is formatted differently from an Advanced View. In addition, we discussed a user challenge and the solution. The challenge is that our work license users want to group their Tasks by whether the Task is LATE, ON TIME, or UPCOMING within the current week. We can only do this through an Advanced Grouping.

How to write the custom text mode to solve the challenge?

First, navigate to the “My Tasks Due This Week” report we previously created in the “Creating Reports Like a Pro! Advanced Views” series. Select the Report Actions dropdown and choose Edit. Next, select the Groupings tab. To the far right you will see two options: Switch to Matrix Grouping and Switch to Text Mode. Choose, Switch to Text Mode.

Our valueexpression function will use the following functions, formulas, and fields:

Functions:

  • textmode
  • 0.valueexpression
  • 0.valueformat

 

Formulas:

  • IF
  • DAYOFWEEK
  • DATE

 

Fields:

  • plannedCompletionDate
  • $$TODAY

 

We will start with our most complex line of code, which is the group.0.valueexpression. The valueexpression function uses the IF formula to determine if the planned completion date of the task is LATE, ON TIME, or UPCOMING throughout the week. We need to create a dynamic “today” value so that the data is processed using today’s date (regardless of when the user views the report. To do this, we will use the wildcard field $$TODAY and extract the date using the DATE formula. Lastly, for both fields $$TODAY and plannedCompletionDate, we need to extract the day of the week in order to analyze if the plannedCompletionDate is less than, equal to, or greater than today’s date so that we can group the task accurately. To do this, we will leverage the DAYOFWEEK formula.

The textmode is:

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group.0.valueexpression=IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})
<DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”LATE”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})=DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”ON
TIME”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))

The second line of text mode will specify the valueformat of the output (valueexpression). For our example, the second line of text mode will be group.0.valueformat=HTML. We can use HTML for almost any valueexpression if you don’t know which format to leverage. We can use the string format, or str. The third and last line of text mode will specify that we are using text mode to create the Grouping, rather than the standard user interface. The third line of text mode will be textmode=true.

When you are finished writing each line of text mode, you should end up with the following block of code:

 

After you select “Done” and “Save + Close”, your end result will be:

 

In Part III, I will share the custom text mode code for both the Task and Assignments reports.

 

 

 

Let’s return to the report we created in our last series, “Advanced Views”. Recall, we added two additional custom columns that displayed data for Days Remaining and Hours Remaining. For each custom View, we leveraged the following functions:

  • displayname
  • valueexpression
  • valueformat
  • textmode

Similarly, we will use many of the functions above within an advanced Grouping, but the syntax will be different.

Unlike advanced Views, advanced Groupings begin with “group.[#].” before identifying the function. When you create your Groupings using the standard user interface, you are limited to three groupings for a standard list or, four groupings when leveraging the matrix setting. However, you can add more groupings when you create your own advanced Groupings but be careful. The more groupings you add to a standard object list report, the messier your report will look.

The syntax for each line within an advanced Grouping reads: group.[#].function. The [#] portion of the text mode identifies which Grouping the function belongs to. Groupings start at 0 and continue to increase by one. For example, the first Grouping in a report is actually group.0.function. The second Grouping is group.1.function and so on. The only exception to the rule is the line for textmode. The textmode line does not use the same format of group.[#].function, but is written as textmode=true (identical to advanced Views).

 

Challenge:

Our work license users want the “My Tasks Due This Week” report to group their tasks by timeliness: LATE, ON TIME, UPCOMING.

  • LATE: Defined as any task with a planned completion date less than today’s date.
  • ON-TIME: Defined as any task with a planned completion date equal to today’s date.
  • UPCOMING: Defined as any task with a planned completion date greater than today’s date.

 

Solution:

We will create custom advanced Groupings to group tasks under the three labels identified above: LATE, ON TIME, and UPCOMING.

Your report will go from this:

To this:

 

In Advanced Groupings Part II, we are going to discuss how to write the custom text mode to solve the challenge.

Did you attend Workfront’s Leap Virtual Conference this year?

LeapPoint participated and sponsored the Workfront Experience Zone this past month and our thought leaders presented in two different breakout sessions. While we missed seeing all our clients in person and hosting our annual event, we were grateful to engage with so many of you in our sessions, discussion forums, and in our virtual booth.

Whether you already attended the Leap virtual experience or missed our speakers, we have provided links to our breakout sessions for your viewing.

Here’s what you missed:

Enabling the CMO with J. Alan Goddard, Senior Director | LeapPoint

CMOs today face incredible pressure to deliver marketing outcomes while simultaneously working with broken processes that don’t scale. The solution isn’t necessarily to buy more technology but to maximize what they already have and translate it into business effectiveness. Join two of LeapPoint’s MarTech and Connected Works leaders as they walk through a connected ecosystem that streamlines processes and delivers sales and marketing outcomes by connecting Workfront, Allocadia, Adobe, Seismic, Percolate, and G6.

WATCH HERE

 

User Adoption Cheat Code with Erin Furrow, Director of Digital Learning | JumpSeat
This course will share how thousands of Workfront users are leveraging JumpSeat for in-application training. Enable your users with step-by-step instructions that guide them on how to perform their work right inside of Workfront. JumpSeat also helps with adapting to changes, including those in the new Workfront experience. All attendees will receive a free 90-day trial version to pilot a guide with your user base.

WATCH HERE

 

LeapPoint helps you harness the full power of your Workfront Investment.

Interested in learning more about LeapPoint? Visit our Workfront Partnership page or connect with our team to schedule your one-on-one Zoom meeting with our Strategic Solutions Manager, Rodney Still at calendly.com/rodneystill.

How do you plan to prepare for the New Workfront Experience?

Enter JumpSeat – a digital adoption platform that provides efficient, effective, and permanent fix for one of the biggest challenge areas of technology implementation. It supplies users with customized, role-based learning experiences that adapt to their needs to drive learning, understanding, and adoptions. Delivering Real-time Training, In-App Experience, and Persona-Based & Customized Learning Paths. Leverage over 30+ prebuilt New Experience guides or build your own!

If you are interested in a demo sign up here.

In the previous blog, “Create Reports Like a Pro! Advanced Views Part II”, we did not have a chance to mention the differences between the Task and Assignment report syntax. If you review the Task object within the API Explorer, you will notice that an Assignment is both a referenced and collected object to the Task object. If you create an Assignment report and you need to reference the task object in your text mode, you need to first specify the task object and then the field.

For example, in the code below, when I reference the plannedCompletionDate, I preface the field with {task}. This tells Workfront that I am calling the Task object’s planned completion date value. Therefore, whenever you create an object report that references a connecting object, add the object enclosed by curly brackets first, followed by a period, and then the referenced object’s field enclosed by curly brackets.

The “My Tasks Due This Week Report” will impress all of your work license users now that you’ve leveraged advanced Views and Groupings. The benefits of adding advanced Groupings to reports and object lists are:

  • Group data in ways that are not native in the standard user interface.
    • The grouping uses an advanced valueexpression to categorize each task rather than leveraging a task field.
  • Control how the grouping displays to your users.
    • The grouping categorizes each task as either LATE, ON TIME, UPCOMING depending on the day of the week and the task’s planned completion date
  • Enhance the user experience by creating dynamic advanced groupings
    • The advanced grouping updates day by day and recategorizes each task using an advanced calculation

Before I share the Task and Assignment text mode code, it is important to note that you cannot create a chart using advanced Groupings or Views. Charts must use either native object fields or custom fields.

The text mode code for both Task and Assignment reports is found below:

Task Report Advanced Grouping Text Mode:

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textmode=true
group.0.valueexpression=IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})
<DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”LATE”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})=DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”ON
TIME”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))
{plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))
group.0.valueformat=HTML

Assignment Report Advanced Grouping Text Mode:

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group.0.valueexpression=IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.{plannedCompletionDate})
<DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”LATE”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.
{plannedCompletionDate})=DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”ON
TIME”,IF(DAYOFWEEK({task}.
{plannedCompletionDate})>DAYOFWEEK(DATE($$TODAY)),”UPCOMING”,”N/A”)))
group.0.valueformat=HTML
textmode=true

 

Stay tuned for the next blog in our series as we are going to discuss advanced filters!

Now it’s time to create our Task report. When creating a new report, it is always best practice to create a name and write a description for the report. The name should be descriptive enough to alert the user what the report is and the description should explain what the report shows.

Report Name: My Tasks Due this Week

Report Description: The My Tasks Due this Week report displays tasks that I am assigned to and have a planned completion date in the current week.

 

Instructions:

  1. Navigate to the Reporting area, select “New Report”, and choose the Task report.
  2. Navigate to the “Report Settings” dropdown and add the Report Title and Description. Select Done, when complete.
  3. Add the following columns: Project Name, Task Name, Status, Assignments, Planned Start Date, Planned Completion Date, Planned Hours, Actual Hours.
  4. Select “Add Column” and drag the new column between Planned Completion Date and Planned Hours,
  5. Confirm the new Column is highlighted blue then select Switch to Text Mode (upper right corner).
  6. Set the displayname to “Days Remaining”.
  7. Create a new line and type: textmode=true
    • This action alerts Workfront that we are using custom text mode rather than using standard fields.
  8. Create a new line for the valueexpression, which will leverage three functions: ROUND, DATEDIFF, and DATE
    • Remember to reference the API Explorer for the camel case values for object fields.
    • Set the valueexpression to: valueexpression=ROUND(DATEDIFF({plannedCompletionDate},DATE($$TODAY)),2)
    • DATE($$TODAY): calculates the date within the parenthesis and we used the $$TODAY wildcard to calculate today’s date.
    • DATEDIFF: calculates the number of days between two dates and we used the Planned Completion Date (camel case form) and DATE($$TODAY) dates.
    • IMPORTANT: Don’t forget to enclose your Workfront field between curly brackets: {plannedCompletionDate}
    • ROUND: rounds the value to the number of decimal places identified, which is 2 in our example.
  9. Create a new line for the valueformat.
    • Set the valueformat to: valueformat=doubleAsDouble
    • The valueformat formats the value of the valueexpression in the report when displayed.
  10. Select “Save”.
  11. Select “Add Column” and confirm that the column displays after the Actual Hours column.
  12. Confirm the new Column is highlighted blue then select Switch to Text Mode (upper right corner).
  13. Set the displayname to “Hours Remaining”.
  14. Create a new line and type: textmode=true
  15. Create a new line for the valueexpression, which will leverage three functions: ROUND, DIV, and SUB.
    • Set the valueexpression to: valueexpression= valueexpression=ROUND(DIV(SUB({workRequired},{actualWorkRequired}),60))
    • SUB({workRequired},{actualWorkRequired): calculates the difference between two fields and we used workRequired (planned hours) and actualWorkRequired (actual hours).
    • DIV: divides two numbers and we used SUB({workRequired},{actualWorkRequired}) and 60; We need to divide by 60 because Workfront uses seconds rather than minutes within the SUB function.
    • ROUND: rounds the value to the number of decimal places identified, which is 2 in our example.
  16. Create a new line for the valueformat.
    • Set the valueformat to: valueformat=doubleAsDouble
  17. Select “Save”.

 

After you have added both custom columns, select “Save + Close”. The report should look similar to the following:

 

In Part III, I will share the text mode code for a Task report and an Assignment report and introduce the series of blogs in the Create Reports Like a Pro series.

 

You are officially on your way to becoming a great Workfront Administrator! You know how to troubleshoot, create a feedback queue, and you have just learned how to read and use Workfront’s API Explorer. Now, let us focus on creating reports and dashboards that are effective and prompt our users to take action.

Every report shares four common areas: Views (Columns), Groupings, Filters, and Charts. We will cover Groupings, Filters, and Charts in later blogs but for now, we are going to focus on creating Advanced Views within a report.

A View on a report displays native and custom data for a given object (the object of a report). Let’s recall the lessons learned from the API Explorer blog. For a given object, you can leverage standard and custom object data, referenced object data, and object collections. Now, let’s create a report to help workers view key performance indicators for tasks they are assigned to.

 

Challenge:

Our work license users want to see how many days are left until the task is late and they want to see how many hours they have left on their tasks.

 

Solution:

Your initial reaction may be to create a Task report. A Task report will work if your organization assigns a single user to a Task. If your organization assigns multiple users to a Task, you will want to create an Assignment report. Don’t worry, the text mode code will be available for both Task and Assignment reports in Part III.

In our example, we will create a Task report with two custom text-mode columns. Days Remaining, and Hours Remaining. Both custom text mode fields are not available through the standard interface.

To create both columns, you need to know the different components of the text mode code we will develop. We will leverage the following functions:

  • displayname
  • valueexpression
  • valueformat
  • textmode

 

The displayname function will display the label name for the column. The valueexpression function enables users to develop formulas for advanced calculations to display data otherwise not available in the standard user interface. The valueformat function allows users to display the data in a variety of formats on a report. Lastly, the textmode function is used to identify the column as custom rather standard.

 

In Part II, we will create the custom text mode code to create both columns: Days Remaining, and Hours Remaining.

 

With nearly half of our clients running an enterprise in-house marketing agency, we get to work with a lot of strategic marketing leaders. While no martech stack or processes look identical, I often hear these three questions: 

  • How can we accelerate marketing and sales?
  • How can we see what content is working best? 
  • What’s the best way to prove marketing value to sales?

 

In this three-part blog series, I’ll address each one of these topics. 

How can we accelerate marketing and sales in a new remote work environment? 

In these Covid-19 times, my clients are seeing even more pressure to accelerate marketing content production while strongly contributing to sales. Finding ways to leverage strategic technology is often the answer. Many of our clients are relying on Seismic, an industry-leading marketing and sales enablement platform, because of these key enabling factors: 

  1. One place for approved, curated content
  2. Recommended content based on audience and popularity
  3. Ability to quickly and easily personalize with variable content
  4. Content tied to CRM shows marketing influence on sales
  5. Metrics on content shows what is being used, what works and what no one ever used, enabling companies to reallocate or reduce marketing spend

 

Financial Services Use Case: 

One large financial services company is enabling their sales team to request digital sales materials, personalize them, and then send using Seismic to track engagement. By leveraging Seismic, the sales team can view content activity across sales stages and how it is impacting deals. It provides visibility into how this content in each deal stage performs by creator, user, documents, group, and even close date. 

What is the benefit of this process? 

  • Both sellers and marketers can see what content is performing best throughout different phases of a sales cycle and then adjust and swap content accordingly. 
  • Delivering the right message at the right time is critical within the sales process to create buyer confidence and to drive relevant conversations. 
  • Being able to access a platform that recommends content automatically based on audience helps drive a smoother sales cycle and keeps buyers engaged the entire time. 

 

Even better – sellers can use this content confidently knowing that it is pre-approved with the latest marketing messaging. They never have to skip a beat or waste their time finding the appropriate content for their sales opportunities ever again. 

In our next blog – we’ll bring to light how to tell what content is working best and where to find it.  

To learn more about how to leverage the LeapPoint & Seismic partnership, click here.

            Now that you are troubleshooting Workfront like a pro, it is time to sharpen your reporting skills. How many times have users asked to create advanced reports that show the number of hours remaining on a task and project or the number of days a task was late? When I was a Workfront System Administrator, my users constantly requested reports that automatically generated the KPIs above. But before we begin creating advanced reports, let’s learn about Workfront’s database structure and how to use the Workfront API Explorer.        

Every Workfront System Administrator should become familiar with the API Explorer. The API Explorer will teach you how different objects are linked together, the reporting limitations within each object in Workfront, and it will eventually prepare you to create amazing reports and integrations!

         First, you can find Workfront’s API by visiting Workfront’s Help site and searching for API Explorer (or by clicking here). The API Explorer is a large table that allows System Administrators to expand each object to see the different fields and components of the object. The API Explorer is broken down into the following parts: The Filter box, Object List, and API Version dropdown.

 

 

The API Version dropdown allows System Administrators to select different versions of Workfront’s API. I recommend selecting the most recent API version for a complete list of fields, references, collections, and actions per object. You don’t need to focus on reviewing different versions because Workfront’s production site will always leverage the most recent API version, which is what you need for advanced reporting.

The Filter (or search bar), allows you to quickly find the object you want to review. If you type “Project” in the Filter bar, the API Explorer will show a list of objects with Project in the name. The Filter bar is a great way to quickly find the object you want to review.

Lastly, there are objects within the table. Each object can be expanded for further detail. Each object has five subtabs: Fields, References, Collections, Search, and Actions.

1) The Fields subtab:

    • The Fields subtab is a comprehensive list of native object fields that can be used on an object report. The API Explorer only shows native Workfront fields, though you can leverage object custom fields in an object report. For example, if I select the Project object and choose the fields subtab, I will see a list of Project fields (like name, description, etc.).
    • Different fields have different field attributes. Each field is expandable for additional detail. Each field will have at least the Field Name and Field Type, but some fields have a lot more information.
    • Each field displays the label (what you see in Workfront) and the camel case name. The camel case name of each field is important when writing custom text mode within a report (I will show you how to use camel case field names in the next blog). Camel case refers to the style in which the fields are written, which is capitalizing the second word within the name. For example, the Planned Start Date field on a Project is actually called plannedStartDate. As you can see, Start and Date are both capitalized and form “humps” within the string.

 

2) The References subtab:

    • The References subtab is a list of all referenced objects that connect to the object you are reviewing.
    • Similar to the Fields subtab, each referenced object can be expanded to see additional detail.
    • The referenced objects are either one level above or parallel to the object you are reviewing. Think of objects as a pyramid. There are different levels within a pyramid and each level “connects”, either directly or indirectly to another level. For example, a referenced Project object is a Portfolio. A Project can only be associated to one Portfolio.
    • Each referenced object has a hyperlink that you can select, which will navigate you to the object within the API Explorer.

 

3) The Collections subtab:

    • The Collections subtab is a list of connecting objects that are grouped within the object you are viewing.
    • To maintain our Pyramid analogy, a collection object on a Project is the Task object. You can have many different Tasks on a single Project, but Tasks are a lower level on the Object Hierarchy. Think of the Object Hierarchy this way: Portfolio (top-level) à Program à Project à
    • You are limited on how you can leverage collection objects within a report, but we will cover that in a future blog post soon!
    • Each collection object has a hyperlink that you can select, which will navigate you to the object within the API Explorer.

 

4) The Search subtab:

    • The Search subtab is used primarily in Custom API calls. Custom API calls are traditionally used by iPaaS (Integration Platform as a Service, like Fusion) solutions or custom application software.

 

5) The Actions subtab:

    • The Actions subtab is used primarily in Custom API calls. Custom API calls are traditionally used by iPaaS (Integration Platform as a Service, like Fusion) solutions or custom application software.

 

Now that you understand the Workfront API Explorer and its different components, you are ready to create advanced reports within Workfront. In the next blog, we will review how to use the API explorer to create Advanced Views.