Best Practices Tag

In today’s marketing landscape, relying on your gut feeling doesn’t work. Instead, sound marketing requires data-driven tactics to make strategic and informed decisions. You can achieve this when you integrate analytics into your marketing. Here’s how:

1. Know your basics

Understand key marketing analytics terms so you can apply vital metrics to reach your marketing goals effectively. Some key marketing analytics terms to learn include:

Leads generated. This is the number of sales leads you produce with your marketing efforts. Sales leads are individuals who are interested in the goods or services you offer and can potentially lead to a paying customer.

Sales growth. This is the rate at which your sales increase over time based on your marketing strategies, such as lead generation.

Conversion rate. This is the percentage of your leads who transform into paying customers.

Web analytics. These are the different types of metrics and data that specifically measure online activity from various platforms, including email and e-commerce. You use web analytics to understand how site visitors use the web so you can optimize your web content. Some key terms include:

  • Click-through rate (CTR). CTR measures the percentage of individuals who clicked on your digital ad or call-to-action (CTA) in comparison to individuals who only viewed it.
  • Traffic. Traffic measures the number of visitors that come to your website.
  • Engagement. Engagement typically measures the rate at which individuals interact with your online content and the way they interact with this content. The pages per session, bounce rate and time on page are a few of the several data points that constitute engagement.
  • Open rate. This metric measures the rate at which recipients of your email campaign open the emails you send.

 

2. Push your metrics further with insights

Without drawing insights from your data, it’s challenging to understand their value. Accomplish this by assessing how specific marketing activities impact different metrics. For instance, you can measure the performance between two different CTAs by comparing the changes in the CTR for each CTA. If you notice the first CTA garners a better CTR, then it may be ideal to use the first call-to-action to drive traffic.

3. Track lead sources

You can better integrate analytics into your marketing by tracking the source channels of your leads. This is especially useful for tracking social media sources. Review the source of your leads by measuring the CTR. This can help you better determine where to focus your marketing efforts.

4. Improve the user experience

You can use data to also enhance the site experience users have when they visit your website. For example, you can monitor changes in your bounce rate before and after making a technical change such as removing images that slow down site performance, to determine the effectiveness of the change. If it decreases your bounce rate and keeps visitors on your site longer, it can mean that it’s enhancing the user experience.

5. Craft your strategy around insights

You can’t maximize your data’s potential if you lack effective strategies. It’s not uncommon for marketers to limit their data’s potential by using it to support pre-made decisions. However, it’s key to leverage the potential of data to drive action. You can do this by crafting your strategy around insights. Consider using these tips to build a driving strategy with marketing analytics:

  • Make marketing analytics accessible. Make sure your team has access to your insight and discuss how analytics impacts your marketing goals.
  • Get help. Get a different perspective and ensure you’re capturing data from different angles by leveraging the help of an expert or partner.
  • Test your tactics. Perform tests to determine if the theories or tactics you have are working based on your analytics.

Digital asset management (DAM) software gives businesses a platform for storing, retrieving, and sharing digital content such as videos, photos, audio files, presentations, and images. Instead of keeping files on different computers, businesses can use DAM software to create a centralized library that gives everyone access to the content they may need.

 

How DAM Software Can Benefit Your Business

Before you purchase DAM software, you should learn about some of the ways it can help your business. You should also learn about some of the most popular software options and the features they offer.

 

Organize Your Digital Media

Without DAM, your business doesn’t have an easy way to organize digital media. At best, you can try to keep certain files in one folder. Given enough time, though, people will forget where they saved files. When they need to retrieve them, they end up wasting a lot of time searching for the files they want.

DAM organizes your files in a central location, so you can quickly find the items you need. You can even add metadata to help you find content. Instead of losing your assets, you organize them in a convenient place that the whole team can access.

Improve Workflow

Since everyone involved in a project has access to the files stored in your DAM software, you can reduce redundancies that slow your workflow. The best DAM software has built-in workflow management features that let you track a project from beginning to end. The smoother your workflow gets, the faster you can bring your projects to market.

Manage Rights and License Agreements

You may not own all of the digital media that your company uses, so you need to keep track of each asset’s rights or license agreements. It’s very difficult to manage rights and license agreements when you store media in folders.

When you use DAM, though, the software remembers all of the rights and license agreements for you. That way, you never mistakenly use content that could get you sued for copyright infringement.

DAM Software Scales to Your Needs

Digital media files can take up a lot of space on your computer, especially when you work with audio and video. Cloud-based DAM software can scale to meet your current needs. If you need more memory today because you’re working on three videos, then the software can accommodate that. Tomorrow, when you work on one video, the software automatically scales down.

Once you find the right DAM, you have all of the memory and processing power that you need to finish your projects.

 

The Top 3 Digital Asset Management Platforms

Make sure you review some of the most popular DAM software options so you can choose one with the features that matter most to you.

Bynder

Bynder excels at giving users access to templates that make it easier for designers to complete projects. Since Bynder uses the AWS cloud, the software can scale to your immediate needs. As your business grows, the software will grow with you. Finally, Bynder has a built-in, customizable workflow feature that lets you improve efficiency and track each step in a project’s progress.

Aprimo

In addition to storing digital media, Aprimo can automatically approve each step of a project. Assuming that the software approves terrific content, you should see your efficiency improve significantly. Aprimo also benefits from its ability to connect to other systems, including Adobe Creative Cloud, eCommerce, and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)

Adobe Experience Manager Assets

Adobe Experience Manager Assets makes it easier for colleagues to collaborate. The collaboration feature should help improve your office’s efficiency. Adobe Experience Manager Assets also stands out for its AI insights. The software will review your content and tell you where you get the best ROI.

Many DAMs will let you try a demo before you purchase. Explore your options, find one that works well for you, and get your DAM life in order.

While many companies are moving toward DevOps processes and tools that fit that framework, few are actually implementing the workflow with the fidelity needed to make teams more productive, according to a Thursday report from 2nd Watch.

Implementing DevOps means fundamentally changing your software engineering process. As with any change of process, success depends on how well the people making the change embrace the principles of the new approach. If people reject, subvert, or undermine the DevOps philosophy, it will fail. Here are six of the most common reasons for DevOps failure, along with tips to increase your chance of success.

1. Creating a traditional “DevOps Department”

78% of the 1,000 IT professionals surveyed said that their organizations continue to have separate teams for managing infrastructure/operations and development—meaning that DevOps is still not fully underway. DevOps involves a collaboration between development, operations, and quality assurance teams. Creating a traditional DevOps department misses the point of making a transition to a DevOps mindset, and is likely to simply add more red tape to existing processes.

This is the opposite of what DevOps should accomplish. Yes, a DevOps implementation requires leadership, but that’s not the same thing as traditional, department-based management. Your DevOps strategy should be implemented as a framework in which your development and operations staff can begin to interoperate, not as a new department that’s tasked with overseeing these disparate groups and somehow forcing them to work together. Focus on getting teams to improve their communication with people working in other departments. In this way, it is possible to assign tasks to the right teams so that every task is completed at the correct point in the overall project workflow.

2. Failing to properly consider staff workloads and other resources

If your developers are already overworked, this might not be the best time to start a dramatic overhaul of their working processes. Before you spring a DevOps implementation on your team, take the time to quantify their workloads and measure performance metrics, so you can see whether individuals are coping with the demands your organization places on them. If you come across an unmanageable boost in workload, you can either re-prioritize the workload or hire new resources to address the staff shortage before you can start your DevOps implementation.

3. Setting unrealistic goals

Never underestimate how big a culture shock DevOps can be in an organization that currently uses a silo structure. You cannot expect everyone to immediately adapt to the change and deliver excellent performance from day one. Be realistic about how long a DevOps implementation is likely to take and set short-term and long-term goals accordingly. And remember: The larger your enterprise is, the longer this transformation is going to take.

4. Creating “hybrid” DevOps while keeping old structures

Some organizations try to reduce the culture shock of DevOps implementation by keeping the business’s old structures intact. However, giving into pushback from developers in this way can undermine the implementation. Rather than keeping the old culture intact, one solution is to build a true hybrid structure that keeps IT operations and development teams in their traditional silos but implements an agile methodology.

5. Misunderstanding the role of business owners

The role of a business owner is to make top-level strategic decisions about the way in which the business is run. It is not to micromanage everything that goes on in the company. While a business owner can decide that the company would benefit from implementing DevOps, they cannot always control how individuals and teams put the principles of DevOps into practice. Rather than trying to impose a new way of doing things, business owners should be willing to listen to the concerns of developers and IT operations employees and find solutions that help them to work more effectively within a DevOps framework.

6. Not embracing a culture where failure is tolerated

Transitioning to DevOps is, first, a cultural shift, and then a process and organizational shift. If you’re considering DevOps simply because “it’s the future”, rather than out of a desire to fundamentally rebuild and improve your business processes, success is highly unlikely.

A key part of the DevOps methodology is failure. Developers should not be afraid to admit to mistakes, particularly when talking about failures could be a vital learning experience for the whole team. When implementing DevOps, be sure to nurture a culture where failure is tolerated.

Unlike the traditional or “waterfall” method of software development, the agile approach does not treat analysis, design, coding, and testing as discrete phases in a development project. Agile has quickly become the standard methodology as businesses see the many advantages of adopting a more flexible approach to software development.

With testing integrated into the development process from day one, agile development often leads to higher quality products, as well as reducing risk. However, making the switch from waterfall to agile can be tricky. Many development teams end up awkwardly straddling the fence between the two approaches, which can make it difficult to effectively manage resources.

To root out any bad habits that carried over when your development team made the switch from waterfall to agile, look out for these warning signs that your team isn’t as agile as you think.

1. No sprint retrospectives

sprint retrospective is a meeting that occurs after a one-month development sprint. Usually held once a month, this is an opportunity for teams to discuss what worked well in the sprint, what could be improved, and what the team will commit to doing differently in the next sprint.

If your team does not hold sprint retrospectives, you are missing out on a valuable opportunity to change work processes in order to improve the quality of the end product. Holding no sprint retrospectives means that problems persist throughout the development process, exposing your business to the risks of waterfall methodology.

2. Long stand-up meetings

Many people resist adopting agile methodology because they think they will spend too much time in meetings. While it’s true that agile development involves a daily stand-up meeting, these should be kept short to avoid eating into everyone’s work time. In fact, the name stand-up comes from the idea that people should literally stand during these meetings so they have an incentive not to let them drag on too long. To avoid stand-up meetings overrunning, have someone with good facilitation skills lead the meeting.

3. Improper product backlog management

product backlog is a list of all the work that needs to be done for a particular product, ordered to prioritize the most important tasks. Sometimes, backlogs can become so large they are difficult to work with. In that case, you need to break the backlog down into short-term and long-term items to make it easier to manage.

4. Failure to deliver product increments after each sprint

One of the principles of agile is that working software is the primary measure of progress. If your team does not deliver a product increment after each spring, that is a warning sign that you are slipping back into waterfall methodology.

5. Urgent tasks that interrupt workflow

When you use the agile approach, your workflows should be regularly adapted to prioritize the most important tasks. If urgent tasks frequently come up and throw your workflow into disarray, that is a sign that the team hasn’t done enough planning to anticipate the upcoming demands of the project. This might be because they are hanging onto waterfall ways of working, such as setting out a roadmap at the beginning of the project and failing to reassess it often enough during sprint retrospectives and daily stand-ups.