Project Management

The transition to digital technology has disrupted nearly every industry. In today’s marketplace, change is no longer optional. Organizations that fail to embrace the digital transformation of business simply can’t compete. Some companies have attempted to move towards digital technologies, only to see their projects fail. Unfortunately, they took a technology-centric approach to convert their business practices. But successful digital transformation isn’t determined by your technology or your strategy – it is determined by the people who make up your business.

The power of human capital

The secret to successfully shifting organizational culture is the same whether you want to improve engagement levels or enhance digital prowess: strong, inspirational leadership at every level of the organization. From the top down, your management team must be capable of making a business case, influencing culture, and connecting with employees on a personal level. With the right leadership, transparent communication, and a strong focus on business solutions, your company’s transition to the digital world is sure to be a win.

Including the right internal resources

One of the biggest mistakes that transformation teams make is not having enough of the right internal people in the mix. The digital transformation of business appears, at first glance, to fall squarely in the IT department’s span of control. Though technology professionals play a critical role, there are a variety of additional internal resources that must be included in your project team. For example, you must enlist assistance from leaders with decision-making authority on operations, quality, and budgeting. Nothing slows a team down more than spending weeks developing a solution that doesn’t meet the needs of the business.

The most effective transformation teams understand that a collaborative approach is the best way to ensure all staff members are on-board. Enlist help from highly-engaged staff members at every level of the organization to take ownership of the digital transition. These early adopters are the first to test new technology, and they can be relied upon to train and encourage their colleagues. By including these individuals on the project team, the transition moves quickly and efficiently through the organization with minimal resistance.

Creating the most effective partnerships

Partners from outside the organization are critical to your success. Of course, this depends on the experience and expertise they bring to the table. Yours is not the first company to move towards digital transformation, and there is no need to reinvent the wheel. Connect with subject matter experts that have developed solutions for a variety of businesses similar to yours. These specialists make it easy to bridge the gap between technology and its deployment.

When engaging partners from outside the organization, thoroughly vet prospects as you would any other business relationship. You are making a significant investment in digital technology, and these individuals can dramatically influence your eventual ROI. Examine previous projects and gain a deep understanding of their successes and failures with other companies. Determine whether potential partners have appropriate capabilities for organizations that are similar in size and volume.

Depending on the product or service you offer and the clientele you serve, your needs will be markedly different. Make sure prospective partners have the experience and expertise required to create solutions that are right for your business.

Learn more about moving your business to the digital world – explore our services and products at www.leappoint.com.

While many companies are moving toward DevOps processes and tools that fit that framework, few are actually implementing the workflow with the fidelity needed to make teams more productive, according to a Thursday report from 2nd Watch.

Implementing DevOps means fundamentally changing your software engineering process. As with any change of process, success depends on how well the people making the change embrace the principles of the new approach. If people reject, subvert, or undermine the DevOps philosophy, it will fail. Here are six of the most common reasons for DevOps failure, along with tips to increase your chance of success.

1. Creating a traditional “DevOps Department”

78% of the 1,000 IT professionals surveyed said that their organizations continue to have separate teams for managing infrastructure/operations and development—meaning that DevOps is still not fully underway. DevOps involves a collaboration between development, operations, and quality assurance teams. Creating a traditional DevOps department misses the point of making a transition to a DevOps mindset, and is likely to simply add more red tape to existing processes.

This is the opposite of what DevOps should accomplish. Yes, a DevOps implementation requires leadership, but that’s not the same thing as traditional, department-based management. Your DevOps strategy should be implemented as a framework in which your development and operations staff can begin to interoperate, not as a new department that’s tasked with overseeing these disparate groups and somehow forcing them to work together. Focus on getting teams to improve their communication with people working in other departments. In this way, it is possible to assign tasks to the right teams so that every task is completed at the correct point in the overall project workflow.

2. Failing to properly consider staff workloads and other resources

If your developers are already overworked, this might not be the best time to start a dramatic overhaul of their working processes. Before you spring a DevOps implementation on your team, take the time to quantify their workloads and measure performance metrics, so you can see whether individuals are coping with the demands your organization places on them. If you come across an unmanageable boost in workload, you can either re-prioritize the workload or hire new resources to address the staff shortage before you can start your DevOps implementation.

3. Setting unrealistic goals

Never underestimate how big a culture shock DevOps can be in an organization that currently uses a silo structure. You cannot expect everyone to immediately adapt to the change and deliver excellent performance from day one. Be realistic about how long a DevOps implementation is likely to take and set short-term and long-term goals accordingly. And remember: The larger your enterprise is, the longer this transformation is going to take.

4. Creating “hybrid” DevOps while keeping old structures

Some organizations try to reduce the culture shock of DevOps implementation by keeping the business’s old structures intact. However, giving into pushback from developers in this way can undermine the implementation. Rather than keeping the old culture intact, one solution is to build a true hybrid structure that keeps IT operations and development teams in their traditional silos but implements an agile methodology.

5. Misunderstanding the role of business owners

The role of a business owner is to make top-level strategic decisions about the way in which the business is run. It is not to micromanage everything that goes on in the company. While a business owner can decide that the company would benefit from implementing DevOps, they cannot always control how individuals and teams put the principles of DevOps into practice. Rather than trying to impose a new way of doing things, business owners should be willing to listen to the concerns of developers and IT operations employees and find solutions that help them to work more effectively within a DevOps framework.

6. Not embracing a culture where failure is tolerated

Transitioning to DevOps is, first, a cultural shift, and then a process and organizational shift. If you’re considering DevOps simply because “it’s the future”, rather than out of a desire to fundamentally rebuild and improve your business processes, success is highly unlikely.

A key part of the DevOps methodology is failure. Developers should not be afraid to admit to mistakes, particularly when talking about failures could be a vital learning experience for the whole team. When implementing DevOps, be sure to nurture a culture where failure is tolerated.

Unlike the traditional or “waterfall” method of software development, the agile approach does not treat analysis, design, coding, and testing as discrete phases in a development project. Agile has quickly become the standard methodology as businesses see the many advantages of adopting a more flexible approach to software development.

With testing integrated into the development process from day one, agile development often leads to higher quality products, as well as reducing risk. However, making the switch from waterfall to agile can be tricky. Many development teams end up awkwardly straddling the fence between the two approaches, which can make it difficult to effectively manage resources.

To root out any bad habits that carried over when your development team made the switch from waterfall to agile, look out for these warning signs that your team isn’t as agile as you think.

1. No sprint retrospectives

sprint retrospective is a meeting that occurs after a one-month development sprint. Usually held once a month, this is an opportunity for teams to discuss what worked well in the sprint, what could be improved, and what the team will commit to doing differently in the next sprint.

If your team does not hold sprint retrospectives, you are missing out on a valuable opportunity to change work processes in order to improve the quality of the end product. Holding no sprint retrospectives means that problems persist throughout the development process, exposing your business to the risks of waterfall methodology.

2. Long stand-up meetings

Many people resist adopting agile methodology because they think they will spend too much time in meetings. While it’s true that agile development involves a daily stand-up meeting, these should be kept short to avoid eating into everyone’s work time. In fact, the name stand-up comes from the idea that people should literally stand during these meetings so they have an incentive not to let them drag on too long. To avoid stand-up meetings overrunning, have someone with good facilitation skills lead the meeting.

3. Improper product backlog management

product backlog is a list of all the work that needs to be done for a particular product, ordered to prioritize the most important tasks. Sometimes, backlogs can become so large they are difficult to work with. In that case, you need to break the backlog down into short-term and long-term items to make it easier to manage.

4. Failure to deliver product increments after each sprint

One of the principles of agile is that working software is the primary measure of progress. If your team does not deliver a product increment after each spring, that is a warning sign that you are slipping back into waterfall methodology.

5. Urgent tasks that interrupt workflow

When you use the agile approach, your workflows should be regularly adapted to prioritize the most important tasks. If urgent tasks frequently come up and throw your workflow into disarray, that is a sign that the team hasn’t done enough planning to anticipate the upcoming demands of the project. This might be because they are hanging onto waterfall ways of working, such as setting out a roadmap at the beginning of the project and failing to reassess it often enough during sprint retrospectives and daily stand-ups.

1. Add a billing record to safeguard project

Although Workfront has recently added a recycling bin feature, deleting a project can cause panic, confusion, and loss of productivity, especially if the project you just deleted was a request queue. Prevent any worry around losing key projects by adding a zero dollar billing record to them.

Even if your company or group isn’t using the billing record feature for its native purpose, it can be used here as an extra layer of protection against project deletion. Simply go to the project, create a new billing record, and set the status to Billed”. Then, if someone attempts to delete the project this error message will display and the project will stay out of the recycling bin:

 

2. Make a placeholder job role to prevent assigning users to parent tasks

By default parent tasks can’t be updated or completed independently from their child tasks. The one task detail that can be independently edited on a parent task is the assignment; however, when users are assigned to parent tasks we find that it often leads to frustration when they receive the inevitable error message for trying update the status or completion percentage. To help prevent project managers and other users from accidentally assigning workers to parent tasks, create a job role titled “Do not assign – Parent Task”. Assign this to all of the parent tasks on your project templates and it will serve as a reminder/safeguard that these tasks are a summary of their child tasks and shouldn’t have a user assigned to them.

 

3. As a plan license user, view the resource planner by user

(Note: this assumes your Workfront instance has completed the prerequisites needed for Resource Planning) The Resource Planner is a helpful widget in Workfront to manage the allocation of resources to projects and forecast their availability for future work. Formerly, this was limited to only users who were listed as Resource Managers on projects. With recent updates, however, any user with a plan license can get valuable information from the Resource Planner by setting the view to “View by User”. If the view is set to View by Project or View by Role, results will only be returned for projects where the user is listed as a Resource Manager, putting you right back at square one. View by User doesn’t have that prerequisite and allows other plan license users to see the allocation of all users, regardless if they’re listed as a resource manager.

 

4. Change ID to name in text mode

(Note: this only works for details tab) When creating views and reports in Workfront, there will be instances where the information you want to display is too many levels away from the object you’re working on. This will limit the display options from the field explorer. For example, when adding a column to a task report or task view for the name of the project sponsor, you will find the only option is “SponsorID”. While this makes sense to the Workfront database, this doesn’t provide much value to users viewing the report. Luckily this can be changed with a quick text mode edit.

While in the report or view editor, click on the column for the ID field and switch to Text Mode.

  • On every line where you see “fieldnameID” change the “ID” to “:name”
  • For example change project:sponsorID to project:sponsor:name
  • Click “Save” in the text mode window, then save the view or report.
displayname=Documents
valuefield=project:sponsor:name
querysort=project:sponsor:name
valueformat=HTML
displayname=
linkedname=project
namekey=view.relatedcolumn
namekeyargkey.0=project
namekeyargkey.1=sponsor
namekeyargkey.2=name

 

5. Flag task commit dates greater than planned completion dates

Commit dates are set by task assignees and can’t be changed by the project owner. While the project manager is notified when commit dates affect the project timeline, it can be hard to quickly review a project and see which task commit dates are later than their planned completion dates. With some text mode code, the commit date field can be added to a task view with conditional formatting to display in red when later than the planned completion date.

This can be done by adding a blank column to a task view and switching to text mode, and pasting in the code below:

displayname= Commit Date
linkedname=direct
namekey=commitDate
querysort=commitDate
styledef.case.0.comparison.icon=false
styledef.case.0.comparison.leftmethod=commitDate
styledef.case.0.comparison.lefttext=commitDate
styledef.case.0.comparison.operator=gt
styledef.case.0.comparison.operatortype=date
styledef.case.0.comparison.rightmethod=plannedCompletionDate
styledef.case.0.comparison.righttext=plannedCompletionDate
styledef.case.0.comparison.trueproperty.0.name=fontstyle
styledef.case.0.comparison.trueproperty.0.value=bold
styledef.case.0.comparison.trueproperty.1.name=textcolor
styledef.case.0.comparison.trueproperty.1.value=d30519
styledef.case.0.comparison.truetext=

Click “Save” in the text mode window then save the view you’re editing. Now when viewing a task list, any user commit dates that are later than the planned completion dates will be displayed in red.

 

6. Link directly to queue topics

Have you ever instructed someone to submit a Workfront request and found yourself listing off the steps of selecting the proper request queue, topic group, then queue topic? Theses directions can be eliminated and the end user experience enhanced by sending them a link directly to the queue topic. Instead of sending the URL “domain.workfront.com/requests” with instructions on which drop downs to select, if you select the request queue & specific queue topic, the URL in your browser grows with each selection. This enables the URL to take the user to the specific queue topic without having to manually make any selections. This is incredibly handy when posting Workfront URLs on intranet sites for users to submit work requests.

 

7. Link directly to a sub-tab on an object

In similar vein to tip #6, URLs can also be built to take users to specific tabs on a project, task, issue, etc. To land a user on a specific sub-tab of an object, Workfront allows for a parameter to be added to the URL with the structure below:

https://<domain>.my.workfront.com/project/view?ID=5b6c7eb5003d2022cea3a135cca33ac1&activeTab=tab-project-updates

Normally when viewing a project (or task, or issue), the URL stops after the object ID regardless of which tab is being viewed. By adding the parameter “&activeTab” the URLs will navigate directly to the project tab of your choosing. Some more examples:

 

URL modifier Landing tab
&activeTab=tab-project-details-forms Project Details
&activeTab=tab-project-approvals Project Approvals
&activeTab=list-project-documents Project Documents
&activeTab=tab-project-updates Project Updates
&activeTab=tab-project-optasks Project Issues

 

The same concept and URL structure works on other Workfront objects such as tasks, issues, programs, portfolios, etc. For other objects, simply change the object reference in the URL examples above from ‘project’ to the object you’re referencing.

 

8. Make sure your browser zoom setting is at 100%

Occasionally, when selecting a request queue or an option from a drop down field in older browsers, the drop down option menu appears on a random part of the screen or, in some cases, doesn’t appear at all. Although this seems like a major issue, 99% it’s not a bug and can be fixed very quickly. Double check the zoom on your browser and make sure it is set to 100%. In certain browsers, if the zoom is set to a value other than 100%, it can cause issues with drop downs appearing.

 

9. Link to documents in a project or task view

Use this text mode trick to create hyperlinks to documents from a project view. When creating a project/task view or report, add a blank column and switch into text mode. Copy and paste in the text mode code below, and be sure to update the <domain> section of the URL with the domain of your Workfront instance.

displayname=Documents
listdelimiter=
listmethod=nested(documents).lists
textmode=true
type=iterate
valueexpression=CONCAT({name}, - "https://&lt;domain&gt;.my.workfront.com/document/view?ID=",{ID},"; ")
valueformat=HTML

Click “Save” the text mode window, then save the view or report. Now, when viewing the results, the names of any attached documents will be listed along with a URL to navigate directly to the document.

 

10. Find projects with no tasks, issues, or documents

After Workfront has been implemented, there will inevitably be projects in your system that were either created by mistake or abandoned shortly after creation. While many of these can be cleaned up by searching your instance for “Untitled Project” and deleting any results, this doesn’t work for projects that have had a name change. To assist in system maintenance, use this text mode to find projects with no tasks, issues, or documents. Creating a project report, go to the filter page, switch into text mode, and paste in the code below:

EXISTS:a:$$EXISTSMOD=NOTEXISTS
EXISTS:a:$$OBJCODE=OPTASK
EXISTS:a:projectID=FIELD:ID
EXISTS:b:$$EXISTSMOD=NOTEXISTS
EXISTS:b:$$OBJCODE=TASK
EXISTS:b:projectID=FIELD:ID
EXISTS:c:$$EXISTSMOD=NOTEXISTS
EXISTS:c:$$OBJCODE=DOCU
EXISTS:c:projectID=FIELD:ID[/CSS]

 

In our buzzword-heavy industry, it isn’t uncommon to believe that some keywords can have the same meaning – for example, data management and information management. Is there a difference between the two? After all, data is information — right? Well, yes and no.

What is Data?

Data is defined as, “Qualitative or quantitative attributes of a variable or set of variables.” Data is more than one such attribute value. Is data information? Yes, information is provided by data but only because data is always specified in some abstract setting. The setting includes:

  • The class to which the attribute belongs
  • The object which is a member of that class
  • Some ideas about object operations or behavior, and relationships to other objects and classes.

Data alone and in the abstract does not provide information.

What is Information?

Information is described as, “that which informs — the answer to a question of some kind. It is thus related to data and knowledge, as data represents values attributed to parameters, and knowledge signifies understanding of real things or abstract concepts.”
Data in its most basic digital format does not provide information. But when it’s combined with other data or is manipulated in some way, that’s when the organization derives value from the information — which then leads to knowledge.

Information Management vs Data Management

The process of information management involves the collecting, maintaining, and storing of information in every available format. When thinking about information management, it is the process of managing individuals whereby the technology and processes are providing control over the delivery, processing, structure, and usage of the information required for business and management purposes. No matter if the informational format is physical or electronic information, the organizational structure must have the capability of managing its information, as well as deliver to multiple channels throughout its life cycle.

Data management is a subset of information management. Data management takes the information a company has and ensures the data is accurate, available, secure, and complete. The process involves the facilitation of a variety of techniques providing that there is control over data from the time of its creation until the time of its deletion. Examples of data management include creating data governance policies, database management system integration, architecture and analysis, and data source identification and data security to name a few.

Why Both Matter to Your Business

When you utilize information and data management, you’re less likely to experience issues with loss of data, use of outdated information, security issues, breaches occurring, or mishandling of information or data. It’s critical for your company to work with contractors with a firm understanding of how to manage both – information and data- to ensure the smooth operation of your business practices with minimal risks.

By understanding the nuances of information management and data management, you can identify gaps in your approach and create a framework that drives high-quality data and, from this, more informed decision-making.

Workfront reporting is great. But you’re pretty much limited to either basic visualizations or tables. If you find yourself using tables a lot, chances are you’re trying to display a whole bunch of information associated with a single record. And while you can easily just tack on additional columns to accommodate this information, sometimes doing so becomes more of a hindrance than a help.

So let’s look at some advanced formatting options you can employ to help consolidate information (and pretty things up a bit too!). Take a look at the screenshot below. This is pulled from our user directory where we found ourselves wanting to display more information than was feasible in a table. So we broke it out into things we need to more closely monitor and/or sort on such as groups and teams. We then collapsed what I’ll call “secondary” information into a single column and applied some fancy formatting to help make it all a bit more legible.

 

 

So what’s going on behind the curtain. It’s really just two main tricks:

  1. Shared columns; and
  2. HTML formatting

 

Shared columns

Let’s look at the shared column function first. The second column in the report–“Name”–is technically two columns combined into one which, oddly enough, actually requires three columns. In the code below you’ll see a reference to column.1, column.2, and column.3. Column.1 is really just pulling in the username, but it uses the default field code which comes with some additional features beyond just the first and last name–most notably the status of the user profile (i.e., registered/unregistered)–so it’s a good idea to pull this directly from the text mode of the username field (or just copy it below!).

Similarly, column.3 contains the default code for the avatar field. The magic happens in the code for column.2 (lines 13-17 below). There are two key things going on here. First, and most importantly, is the code “column.2.sharecol=true”.This is the code that tells Workfront to join the adjacent columns on either side. IMPORTANT! You ALSO have to include the sharecol code on what would be the column to the left in order for everything to work. In this case, that’s column.1. The other interesting piece of code worth mentioning is on line 16. The <hr> (horizontal rule) tag is what inserts that nifty line between the username and avatar. Now, in theory, you can leave “column.2.value=” blank. But in this case it’s a great formatting tool to help provide both visual interest and some boundaries between the two data elements. Alright! Grab the code below, drop in the second column of your report and let’s hop on to the next piece: HTML formatting (it’s worth pointing out, the column identifiers in text mode start at zero so column.1 technically refers to the second column of the report. If you wanted this to be the first column you’d need to subtract one from each of the column identifiers, i.e, column.0, column.1 and so on).

column.1.displayname=
column.1.linkedname=direct
column.1.namekey=name
column.1.querysort=name
column.1.sharecol=true
column.1.textmode=true
column.1.tile.name=component.user.name
column.1.usewidths=true
column.1.valuefield=name
column.1.valueformat=HTML
column.1.width=100
column.1.tile.template=/WEB-INF/jsp/lists/components/username.jsp
column.2.sharecol=true
column.2.shortview=false
column.2.textmode=true
column.2.value=<hr>
column.2.valueformat=HTML
column.3.displayname=
column.3.linkedname=direct
column.3.namekey=avatar
column.3.textmode=true
column.3.tile.name=component.avatar
column.3.usewidths=true
column.3.valueformat=HTML
column.3.width=100


HTML formatting

Ok the next part looks a lot more formidable but it’s actually pretty simple. Using the sharecol principles we just learned, this piece is really just creating unique columns for the formatted text (title, manager, access level, etc.) and the corresponding user data. So, for example, in column.4 you have the word “title” and in column.5 you have the actual user title data, all of which gets mushed together using the sharecol=true function.

The important lines to pay attention to are the ones that contain HTML formatting such as line 6 where you have <font color=000000><b>Title: </b></font>. Admittedly, this is all a bit easier if you’re already familiar with HTML and CSS, but technically this is just taking two simple HMTL attributes and wrapping the text “Title: ” in them. As you may have already guessed, the font color attribute allows you to change the native color of the text while <b> is making the font bold. A couple things I want to point out. First, the colors we’ve used are what’s known as hexadecimal or “hex”, colloquially. You may have seen them with the hash symbol in front. Ours, obviously, do not have them. Workfront text mode will accept either. Additionally, Workfront will also accept basic colors in word format (i.e., red, black, blue, green, etc.) so if you’re working with a very simple, primary color set, a lot of times that’s just easier. And finally, Workfront also accepts RGB values. In the example above, we would just change the hex code to an RGB value as well as the corresponding HTML attribute: <font color=rgb(0,0,0)><b>Title: </b></font>. A lot of options. Use what feels easiest.

So what are some of the other formatting tricks you can employ beyond bold and font color? There are certainly some limitations that you wouldn’t encounter if you were using traditional CSS but we’ve compiled as complete a list as we can think of at the end of this post.

One last thing I’ll point out about the columns that contain formatted text: since they’re not referencing any actual data, they all use value= as opposed to valuefield= or valueexpression=. As you start to adapt this to your own needs it’s an important thing to take note of.

column.4.displayname=User Information
column.4.sharecol=true 
column.4.shortview=false 
column.4.textmode=true 
column.4.usewidths=true 
column.4.value=<font color=000000><b>Title: </b></font> 
column.4.valueformat=HTML column.4.width=200 
column.5.descriptionkey=title 
column.5.linkedname=direct 
column.5.namekey=title.abbr 
column.5.sharecol=true 
column.5.shortview=false 
column.5.textmode=true 
column.5.usewidths=true 
column.5.valuefield=title 
column.5.valueformat=HTML 
column.5.width=200 
column.6.sharecol=true 
column.6.shortview=false 
column.6.textmode=true 
column.6.usewidths=true 
column.6.value= <font color=000000><b>Manager: </b></font> 
column.6.valueformat=HTML column.6.width=200 
column.7.descriptionkey=manager 
column.7.link.linkproperty.0.name=ID 
column.7.link.linkproperty.0.valuefield=manager:ID 
column.7.link.linkproperty.0.valueformat=int 
column.7.link.lookup=link.view 
column.7.link.valuefield=manager:objCode 
column.7.link.valueformat=val 
column.7.linkedname=manager 
column.7.namekey=manager 
column.7.querysort=manager:name 
column.7.sharecol=true 
column.7.shortview=false 
column.7.textmode=true 
column.7.usewidths=true 
column.7.valuefield=manager:name 
column.7.valueformat=HTML 
column.7.width=200 
column.8.sharecol=true 
column.8.shortview=false 
column.8.textmode=true 
column.8.usewidths=true 
column.8.value= <font color=000000><b>Access Level: </font><font color=CC0033> 
column.8.valueformat=HTML column.8.width=200 
column.9.descriptionkey=accesslevel 
column.9.linkedname=accessLevel 
column.9.namekey=accesslevel 
column.9.querysort=accessLevel:name 
column.9.sharecol=true 
column.9.shortview=false 
column.9.textmode=true 
column.9.usewidths=true 
column.9.valuefield=accessLevel:displayName 
column.9.valueformat=HTML 
column.9.width=200 
column.10.displayname=Primary Associated Fields 
column.10.sharecol=true 
column.10.shortview=false 
column.10.textmode=true 
column.10.usewidths=true 
column.10.value=</b></font><hr><font color=0000FF><b>Primary Job Role: </b></font> 
column.10.valueformat=HTML 
column.10.width=200 
column.11.descriptionkey=role 
column.11.displayname=Primary Job Role 
column.11.linkedname=role 
column.11.namekey=name 
column.11.sharecol=true 
column.11.shortview=false 
column.11.textmode=true 
column.11.usewidths=true 
column.11.valuefield=role:name 
column.11.valueformat=HTML 
column.11.width=200 
column.12.displayname=Primary Associated Fields 
column.12.sharecol=true 
column.12.shortview=false 
column.12.textmode=true 
column.12.usewidths=true 
column.12.value= <font color=0000FF><b>Home Group: </b></font> 
column.12.valueformat=HTML column.12.width=200 
column.13.descriptionkey=homegroup 
column.13.linkedname=homeGroup 
column.13.listsort=nested(homeGroup).string(name) 
column.13.namekey=homegroup 
column.13.sharecol=true 
column.13.shortview=false 
column.13.textmode=true 
column.13.usewidths=true 
column.13.valuefield=homeGroup:name 
column.13.valueformat=HTML 
column.13.width=200 
column.14.sharecol=true 
column.14.shortview=false 
column.14.textmode=true 
column.14.usewidths=true 
column.14.value= <font color=0000FF><b>Home Team: </b></font> 
column.14.valueformat=HTML 
column.14.width=200 
column.15.descriptionkey=hometeam 
column.15.linkedname=homeTeam 
column.15.namekey=hometeam 
column.15.shortview=false 
column.15.textmode=true 
column.15.valuefield=homeTeam:name 
column.15.valueformat=HTML



Additional attributes

Italic
Attribute
<i></i>
Can you use it in a sentence?
<font color=0000FF><i>Home Group: </i></font>
Output
Home Group:

Bold
Attribute
<b></b>
Can you use it in a sentence?
<font color=0000FF><b>Home Group: </b></font>
Output
Home Group:

Font size
Attribute
<font size=></font>
Can you use it in a sentence?
<font size=18><Home Group: </font>
Output
Home Group:

Font color
Attribute
<font color=></font>
Can you use it in a sentence?
<font color=red><Home Group: </font>
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Have you ever been working in a Workfront project and needed to find the point of contact or name of the person who originally submitted the request? If so, you’ve probably also experienced the annoyance of having to navigate back to the original request just to find that information. As you’ve probably already guessed if you read the title, there’s a much simpler way. With a little easy set-up on the front end you can save yourself some serious aggravation.

 

  • Add a calculated field to the request custom form
  • Give the field a name
  • Set the format type as needed (for all the list fields below the format will be “Text”)
  • Add the appropriate issue calculation in the calculation area (see listing below) and click Save
  • Add the same calculated field to the corresponding project custom form
  • In the calculation area enter the name of the calculated field and click Save

 

And that’s it! Pretty easy, huh? So what these calculations are going to do is create a field on the issue form that references a native issue object (project queue, original requestor, etc.) and—since a field can’t self-reference—the project calculation will point to the same field on the only possible related object: the request. Repeat the above process for any additional data points you want to capture.

 

Requestor name

Field name: Original Requestor

Issue calculation: Owner.Name

Project calculation: Original Requestor

 

Queue project

Field name: Queue Project

Issue calculation: Project.Name

Project calculation: Queue Project

 

Parent request type

Field name: Parent Request Type

Issue calculation: Queue Topic.Parent Topic Group.Name

Project calculation: Parent Request Type

 

Request type

Field name: Request Type

Issue calculation: Queue Topic.Name

Project calculation: Request Type

 

Requestor company

Field name: Requestor Company

Issue calculation: Owner.Company.Name

Project calculation: Requestor Company

 

Request reference number

Field name: Request Reference Number

Issue calculation: Reference Number

Project calculation: Request Reference Number

 

Primary contact

Field name: Request Primary Contact

Issue calculation: Primary Contact

Project calculation: Request Primary Contact

 

 

Three ways to know if agile marketing is right for your business

With the growing competition in the marketplace, brands from every sector are looking for new ways to be innovative and rise above the fray. Innovation means not only a willingness to implement change but also an openness to trying new approaches to doing business.

For marketers, this can be exceedingly challenging. Marketing professionals in top businesses across the globe are constantly keeping tabs on changes in their industry and working to identify new ways to get ahead of the competition. This includes studying marketing trends, analyzing the wealth of data that is currently available about consumers, and tapping all available resources to launch new marketing campaigns.

With the highly competitive nature of today’s global economy, it’s difficult to know what strategies can help your business beat the competition. That’s why marketing professionals are turning to agile marketing. This concept, which was born in the information technology industry, has implications for the business world. Agile marketing offers a new way of thinking about business, with concepts that can be applied across the organization to produce better outcomes.

If you want to know if agile marketing is a good fit for your business, take a look at your company and ask yourself these three questions.

How easily does your business respond to change?

While many marketers rely on techniques that are tried and true, this method calls for something entirely different. To take advantage of agile marketing, companies need to monitor the success of their business activities and be prepared to change. This method of marketing calls for validated learning over conventional thinking, prioritizing the kind of customer engagement that has the data to back it up. You’ll need to create marketing plans for both the short-term and the long-term, as well as the middle ground, and make adjustments as you go, using the insights gained from digital marketing analytics.

Agile marketing is best when teams can be flexible in their marketing work and quick to adapt. There is still a role for managers to play, but the business will need to be flexible in order to accommodate changing priorities. With this approach, small marketing experiments can take businesses further than large initiatives that can’t be adjusted down the road.

Can your team identify and adapt to customer desires?

At its heart, agile marketing is about putting the customer first and responding proactively to the changing habits and desires of consumers. This means you’ll need to view your relationship with customers as a collaborative one, where their input on your products, services and marketing efforts hold just as much weight as the expert opinions on your own team.

By implementing agile marketing, you’ll be able to discover a clean customer profile and learn a lot about what consumers want from your company. This will take a higher priority than business predictions, because the marketing method centers on meeting customer needs and adapting the marketing to better suit the customer. This could mean changing marketing and media platforms, using more direct campaigns, adding value to products and services, or adjusting your business plan to suit consumer needs. It may also mean new processes, evaluations and surveys, and reiterations of existing business marketing strategies. They key is to keep the changing desires of the customer at the center of the work you do.

What resources within your organization can support agile marketing?

Before you begin the journey into agile marketing, ask yourself if your business is ready for agile marketing. Take a look at the leaders and teams within your organization, and determine whether they adapt well to change and whether they have the tools they need in order to make major adjustments. Managers and marketing professionals at every level will need to feel empowered to respond to customer opinions, and your business will need to have a high degree of flexibility in order to make agile marketing work.

As a team, you will still need a strategic vision, but you should plan to revisit the vision at each major milestone, in order to determine whether the new strategy is working. You’ll also need to make sure you are properly staffed to handle frequent releases of updated products, services or materials. Your team should be prepared to work collaboratively and with a high degree of respect for one another, while also moving through several learning cycles in order to find out what tactics are most effective. You’ll also need to have team members on staff who can provide support, provide a thorough understanding of data analytics, and keep in frequent contact with the customer. The data will help reveal possible steps forward and the customer feedback will tell you if you’re new approach of agile marketing is working for them.

Agile marketing calls for flexible leadership, business and marketing innovation, and a commitment to the customer, all driven by data and evidence of changing trends. It will require constant change, reliable problem-solving, and agility from the entire team. The end result for teams who can successfully implement agile marketing is a competitive advantage that is unique to the company, which will lead to enhanced customer appreciation and loyalty.

Originally posted on Engyte.com

Workfront empowers teams to do their best work. When integrated with Egnyte, teams can deliver that work even faster. With project and file collaboration available right in the native Workfront interface, the Egnyte connector enables secure, real-time synchronization so that your software solutions produce better results .

Experience Real-Time Collaboration

Workfront is the online project management software that allows you to manage all the work you do in one place. With Workfront, teams receive requests in a standardized format and managers can easily prioritize incoming projects, assign them  to the right team member, and get real time updates on progress—all without ever leaving Workfront’s customizable project management solution.

Egnyte’s integration with Workfront allows users to dynamically link Egnyte documents directly to Workfront projects.  Workfront allows entire folders to be shared — not just individual files — and syncs any changes made to those files from to Egnyte, and vice versa.

 

 

One Location, One Solution

Stop wasting time and resources inefficiently managing documents and digital assets created in silos.  Leverage the Egnyte + Workfront connector for end-to-end lifecycle management and replace dozens of tools for a single solution that offers the following:

  • Organize & Visualize– Documents can be organized and accessed by project. Each team member can view documents and digital assets the way they want.
  • Collaborate & Share – Collaborate and share work with your team, external stakeholders and/or third-party contributors. Keep all discussions, questions, comments and versions in the context of the document throughout its lifecycle.
  • Approve & Distribute – Easily set up, trigger, and track approval processes. Approvers have a single place to access all approvals with contextual access to the document collaboration stream, previous versions, and work details to make quick, informed decisions.

 

Integration is Simple

Configure the connector in 3 simple steps:

  1. Procure a Connector license from LeapPoint
  2. Add the Connector to Workfront (admin access required)
  3. Start using the integration

 

Once enabled, you can seamlessly synchronize files across your Workfront and Egnyte systems to keep all team members on the same page.

 

Get Started

In order to leverage the Workfront + Egnyte connector, users must purchase an annual license (only one required per Workfront or Egnyte instance). Please visit our page to learn more about Workfront licensing.

This year at Leap London, our very own Deven Ravel, former Marine Captain, gave a brilliant presentation on the lessons he’s taken away from his time in the Marines and how he’s applied them to real-world, corporate challenges. Deven told the story of his tour in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province where two members of his squad suffered life-changing injuries in a Taliban ambush and how those events proved to be the best change agents he’d ever encountered—forcing the Marines to adapt to their changed circumstances and breaking new ground in their lives.

He set out 10 key lessons from his experience:

1. Know yourself

It’s not just what you do. You have to think of yourself as the whole organization. Look at the people and the tools you have. What are the expectations of those people? And what about the people you are going to need but haven’t hired yet? Are you thinking two steps ahead?

2. Know your mission

Solutions need to be aligned up and down and organization. This means ensuring that strategic goals (business objectives) are aligned with operational goals (processes and procedures) and tactical goals (delivery).

3. Study history

Know the culture of your organization and understand where it came from. Understanding the history of an organization—knowing where its core values come from—can help tailor change programs to the character of the business.

4. Set expectations

Clear expectations prevent wriggle-room for mistakes. It means you can ask, ‘Do you not understand what was expected?’ or ‘Did I explain it wrong?’

5. Be brilliant in the basics

What are the core standards you expect everyone to have? What are the basic skills that are needed? It’s not about job performance; this is about bare minimum expectations. For his squad of Marines, that meant basic first aid, understanding communication signals, and weapons training.

6. Standardize communications

Define what different communication channels are used for. Make it clear when a team should use instant messenger tools like Slack, email, or Workfront to share information.

7. Build trust

This is hard to measure—it comes from the gut. The key step is to identify change agents within an organization who can help promote change. Those change agents have common attributes among their peers:

  • Influential
  • Respected
  • Impartial
  • Positive
  • Empathetic
  • Proactive

8. Decentralize and empower

If you have established clear expectations, clear communication and aligned objectives, smaller teams will be empowered to act and innovate.

9. Execute with a plan

We ask, ‘What works for the tools you have and the type of work you do?’ If the plan doesn’t fit the tools, the people, or the type of organization, it’s going to be tough to execute.

10. Reflect openly and often

You can only reflect openly and often once you’ve built a culture of trust in your organization. As managers, we need to ask, ‘How can I help you do this better?’